Friday, 25 October 2013

Cthulhu waits dreaming... of Cthulhette?

Go read this. It's light on detail for a science bit, but oddly Cthulhic. There's more on midshipmen here - look at the relationships to our physiology.

A few passages for the essence of the thing:

A mysterious hum has been keeping people in Hampshire awake all night ...
...
Male Midshipman fish let out a deep, resonating drone which attracts females and acts as a challenge to other males. ... once they get going can keep up the distracting hum all night. 
... the noise created by the Midshipman is of such a low frequency and long wavelength that it can carry through the ground, walls ...
...
... "I thought I was going mad at first. ..."

The question then: what else might be disturbing our sleep we don't yet know about..?
_

9 comments:

garrisonjames said...

Interesting...very inspirational, in some weird ways...

John Till said...

This is one of the oddest stories that I have read in a while! Sleep disturbed by humming fish. Makes you wonder if some great cephalopod's dreaming could be disturbed by the chants of meditating monks... or other things.

Jedediah said...

How about The Hum?

Or this unearthly sound (link will open a download of a soundfile). It's a bearded seal, but it sounds like something from outer space.

The Inner Geek said...

Now I'll be wondering what a Cthulhette might look like all day. Madness ensues.

garrisonjames said...

Weren't the Cthulhette's a girl band from the early Sixties? Can't recall the name of their one hit song, but the tune was catching, easy to hum along with...

Porky said...

Weird it is, and I had no idea it was so widespread, enough to be classified like that, as a capitalised Hum. I recommend following the links Jedediah left - the sound is incredible, and nothing I'd connect with a seal. That link has a little extra text in the URL, so here it is again.

Re the Hum, it may be that this particular instance, the one described in the newspaper article, is an explanation of the entry for Southampton.

It also raises more questions. Just the obvious ones:

- Is there one source for every instance of the Hum, or could the Hum cover several distinct sources, each specific to a set of geographic locations or the group of people involved, or some other factor?

- How much variation is there in the human population when it comes to sensitivity to stimuli, or rather how differently could we each physiologically relate to the world?

- Could this kind of subtle physiological difference be leading to difficulty in understanding or being understood, or be a factor in certain behaviours, or the appearance of certain frictions?

- Back towards the original question, how much could there be that some of us can sense or be affected by in some way, but isn't yet recognised or named?

- More interestingly, how many phenomena could actually be undetectable by our senses even with the aid of current technology, in that we may not be looking for them, or know that we could?

garrisonjames said...

Those are interesting links. Jedediah strikes again with amazingly cool stuff! The Hum is pretty disconcerting, if you consider how wide-spread the phenomena seems to be. There needs to be some version of this thing/event in Wermspittle...

Loquacious said...

reverse Siren, huh? neat thought.

Porky said...

I didn't think of that. I wonder how much else could be cast in a different light by this.

And something like it would fit Wermspittle like a glove.